Archive for June 2011

Free Classics: “Flappers and Philosophers” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Every Friday, Marilyn Knapp Litt, who blogs at ClassicKindle.com, brings us her recommendation of a free classic book to discover (or rediscover) on Kindle. Find more of Marilyn’s recommendations at her blog, ClassicKindle.com, a guide to the best free and inexpensive classic literature for the Kindle. You can also get Marilyn’s blog on Kindle and I recommend that you “Like” the Classic Kindle Facebook page as well so you don’t miss anything. Here’s Marilyn’s post:

I am suggesting Flappers and Philosophers by F. Scott Fitzgerald. His short stories are held in high regard and this collection has one of my favorites, “Bernice Bobs Her Hair.” (The short story index is hyperlinked, which is nice.)

Warren danced the next full dance with Bernice, and finally, thankful for the intermission, he led her to a table on the veranda. There was a moment’s silence while she did unimpressive things with her fan.

“It’s hotter here than in Eau Claire,” she said.

Warren stifled a sigh and nodded. It might be for all he knew or cared. He wondered idly whether she was a poor conversationalist because she got no attention or got no attention because she was a poor conversationalist.

“You going to be here much longer?” he asked, and then turned rather red. She might suspect his reasons for asking.

“Another week,” she answered, and stared at him as if to lunge at his next remark when it left his lips.

Warren fidgeted. Then with a sudden charitable impulse he decided to try part of his line on her. He turned and looked at her eyes.

“You’ve got an awfully kissable mouth,” he began quietly.

This was a remark that he sometimes made to girls at college proms when they were talking in just such half dark as this. Bernice distinctly jumped. She turned an ungraceful red and became clumsy with her fan. No one had ever made such a remark to her before.

“Fresh!”–the word had slipped out before she realized it, and she bit her lip. Too late she decided to be amused, and offered him a flustered smile.

Warren was annoyed. Though not accustomed to have that remark taken seriously, still it usually provoked a laugh or a paragraph of sentimental banter. And he hated to be called fresh, except in a joking way. His charitable impulse died and he switched the topic.

No diamond as big as the Ritz here, but lots of gems!

Download your free copy of Flappers and Philosophers by F. Scott Fitzgerald here >>

Amanda Hocking Makes Strong Showing in this Week’s Most Wanted

After several weeks with only one or two books in the 25 Most Wanted, Amanda Hocking makes a strong return thanks to her new book, Virtue. This week, Hocking has five titles on the list.

BookLending.com Most Wanted

Week of June 6, 2011

1. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen

2. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

3. Catching Fire (The Second Book of the Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

4. Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

5. Carrots by Colleen Helme

6. Summer Secrets by Barbara Freethy

7. Torn (Trylle Trilogy, Book 2) by Amanda Hocking

8. My Horizontal Life by Chelsea Handler

9. Switched (Trylle Trilogy, Book 1) by Amanda Hocking

10. Ryan’s Return by Barbara Freethy

11. Unlocked by Courtney Milan

12. My Blood Approves by Amanda Hocking

13. The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins

14. The Kane Chronicles, Book One: The Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan

15. Virtue – A Fairy Tale by Amanda Hocking

16. May Day (Murder-by-Month Mysteries, No. 1) by Jess Lourey

17. [NSFW] Tied Up, Tied Down: Rough Riders, Book 4 by Lorelei James

18. The Throne of Fire by Rick Riordan

19. Desperate Desires (A Sweet and Spicy Novella) by Terri Wolffe

20. Why Me? by Sarah Burleton

21. The Underland Chronicles: Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins

22. Shattered: A Daughter’s Regret by Melody Carlson

23. Ascend (Trylle Trilogy, #3) by Amanda Hocking

24. The Bargain by Mary J. Putney

25. Always the Baker, Never the Bride by Sandra D. Bricker

Free Classics: “Scaramouche” by Rafael Sabatini

Every Friday, Marilyn Knapp Litt, who blogs at ClassicKindle.com, brings us her recommendation of a free classic book to discover (or rediscover) on Kindle. Find more of Marilyn’s recommendations at her blog, ClassicKindle.com, a guide to the best free and inexpensive classic literature for the Kindle. You can also get Marilyn’s blog on Kindle and I recommend that you “Like” the Classic Kindle Facebook page as well so you don’t miss anything. Here’s Marilyn’s post:

He was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad.

I can’t claim authorship of the first line of Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini. It is one of the most famous first lines in literature, but I love being able to use it as the first line of my blog!

Here is an excerpt from a random Amazon review of Sabatini:

I write this message to announce my great good fortune to have discovered at last the novels of Rafael Sabatini … About heroes and villains, betrayals, loves lost and regained, great injustice and final satisfaction, epic action and adventure, tiny misunderstandings that change the course of lives, twisting plots hung from cliffs, complex characters who struggle with life, waver, try a different path, lose faith and regain it.

This was a book that I loved in my youth. The rest of the book is as readable as the beginning. But in case you don’t believe me, here is a sample:

“Had I been born a gentleman, do you say?” quoth he, in a slow, bewildered voice. “But I was born a gentleman. My race is as old, my blood as good as yours, monsieur.”

From M. le Marquis there was a slight play of eyebrows, a vague, indulgent smile. His dark, liquid eyes looked squarely into the face of M. de Vilmorin.

“You have been deceived in that, I fear.”

“Deceived?”

“Your sentiments betray the indiscretion of which madame your mother must have been guilty.”

The brutally affronting words were sped beyond recall, and the lips that had uttered them, coldly, as if they had been the merest commonplace, remained calm and faintly sneering.

A dead silence followed. Andre-Louis’ wits were numbed. He stood aghast, all thought suspended in him, what time M. de Vilmorin’s eyes continued fixed upon M. de La Tour d’Azyr’s, as if searching there for a meaning that eluded him. Quite suddenly he understood the vile affront. The blood leapt to his face, fire blazed in his gentle eyes. A convulsive quiver shook him. Then, with an inarticulate cry, he leaned forward, and with his open hand struck M. le Marquis full and hard upon his sneering face.

Don’t you want to know what happens next?

Download your free copy of Scaramouche here >>