Archive for July 2011

Free Classics: “Right Ho, Jeeves” by P.G. Wodehouse

Every Friday, Marilyn Knapp Litt, who blogs at ClassicKindle.com, brings us her recommendation of a free classic book to discover (or rediscover) on Kindle. Find more of Marilyn’s recommendations at her blog, ClassicKindle.com, a guide to the best free and inexpensive classic literature for the Kindle. You can also get Marilyn’s blog on Kindle and I recommend that you “Like” the Classic Kindle Facebook page as well so you don’t miss anything. Here’s Marilyn’s post:

Yes, you should buy a Kindle, just so you can be introduced to Bertie Wooster (kept in line by his butler Jeeves) and Bertie’s friends, such as the incomparable Gussie Fink-Nottle!

The course of true love never did run smooth and obviously the British do not know the cautionary tale of “speak for yourself John Alden.” Here you will read a similar tale about Gussie, who is a newt loving man-about-town. As a bonus, you will learn why you should never combine public speaking with over consumption!

Of the many hysterical Jeeves & Wooster books by P.G. Wodehouse, Right Ho, Jeeves is considered the most hilarious and falling down funny . . . by me . . . and others. Find out for yourself. What better gift to yourself than a good read and a good laugh? And it is free!

Here is a bit of Jeeves and Wooster patter from this novel, but it could have come from any of them. It is a typical exchange about Bertie’s wardrobe that fans of the series have come to expect. Wait for it . . .

“Yes, Jeeves?” I said. “Something on your mind, Jeeves?”

“I fear that you inadvertently left Cannes in the possession of a coat belonging to some other gentleman, sir.”

I switched on the steely a bit more.

“No, Jeeves,” I said, in a level tone, “the object under advisement is mine. I bought it out there.”

“You wore it, sir?”

“Every night.”

“But surely you are not proposing to wear it in England, sir?”

Download your free copy of “Right Ho, Jeeves” by P.G. Wodehouse here >>

25 Most Wanted – Week of June 27

1. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen

2. Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

3. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

4. Catching Fire (The Second Book of the Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

5. Summer Secrets by Barbara Freethy

6. My Horizontal Life by Chelsea Handler

7. Unlocked by Courtney Milan

8. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

9. Torn (Trylle Trilogy, Book 2) by Amanda Hocking

10. Switched (Trylle Trilogy, Book 1) by Amanda Hocking

11. [NSFW] Taking Chase: Chase Brothers, Book 2 by Lauren Dane

12. May Day (Murder-by-Month Mysteries, No. 1) by Jess Lourey

13. Go the F**k to Sleep by Adam Mansbach, Ricardo Cortes

14. Dating Dr. Notorious (Never Too Late Series) by Donna McDonald

15. SEAsoned: A Chefs Journey with Her Captain by Victoria Allman

16. The Throne of Fire by Rick Riordan

17. [NSFW] Making Chase: Chase Brothers, Book 4 by Lauren Dane

18. [NSFW] Chased: Chase Brothers, Book 3 by Lauren Dane

19. The Secret Holocaust Diaries by Nonna Bannister

20. Golden Lies by Barbara Freethy

21. Between the Lines by Tammara Webber

22. Linger by Maggie Stiefvater

23. Forever by Maggie Stiefvater

24. Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire

25. Compromising Positions by Jenna Bayley-Burke

Free Classics: “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” by James Joyce

Every Friday, Marilyn Knapp Litt, who blogs at ClassicKindle.com, brings us her recommendation of a free classic book to discover (or rediscover) on Kindle. Find more of Marilyn’s recommendations at her blog, ClassicKindle.com, a guide to the best free and inexpensive classic literature for the Kindle. You can also get Marilyn’s blog on Kindle and I recommend that you “Like” the Classic Kindle Facebook page as well so you don’t miss anything. Here’s Marilyn’s post:

I love this book. It is a very readable story about an Irish boy and his Catholic upbringing. It is a semi-autobiographical novel of Joyce’s own childhood. But it was not novelistic enough for some of his family who wished to disown him.

Here is a taste:

On each of the seven days of the week he further prayed that one of the seven gifts of the Holy Ghost might descend upon his soul and drive out of it day by day the seven deadly sins which had defiled it in the past; and he prayed for each gift on its appointed day, confident that it would descend upon him, though it seemed strange to him at times that wisdom and understanding and knowledge were so distinct in their nature that each should be prayed for apart from the others.

Or:

During the first part of the summer in Blackrock uncle Charles was Stephen’s constant companion. Uncle Charles was a hale old man with a well tanned skin, rugged features and white side whiskers. On week days he did messages between the house in Carysfort Avenue and those shops in the main street of the town with which the family dealt. Stephen was glad to go with him on these errands for uncle Charles helped him very liberally to handfuls of whatever was exposed in open boxes and barrels outside the counter. He would seize a handful of grapes and sawdust or three or four American apples and thrust them generously into his grandnephew’s hand while the shopman smiled uneasily; and, on Stephen’s feigning reluctance to take them, he would frown and say:

—Take them, sir. Do you hear me, sir? They’re good for your bowels.

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is to Ulysses, what The Hobbit is to The Lord of the Rings. It is an earlier, easier, essential read before tackling the longer book.

Download your free copy of “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” by James Joyce here >>