Archive for January 2012

Free Classics: Elizabeth and Her German Garden by Elizabeth von Arnim

Every Friday, Marilyn Knapp Litt, who blogs at ClassicKindle.com, brings us her recommendation of a free classic book to discover (or rediscover) on Kindle. Find more of Marilyn’s recommendations at her blog, ClassicKindle.com, a guide to the best free and inexpensive classic literature for the Kindle. You can also get Marilyn’s blog on Kindle and I recommend that you “Like” the Classic Kindle Facebook page as well so you don’t miss anything. Here’s Marilyn’s post:

Elizabeth and Her German Garden by Elizabeth von Arnim is an 1898 novel. Although this is a novel, it follows the author’s life in she also was an English woman who married a German Count.

I love this comment from a review on Amazon UK from one of the reader reviewers: “Anyone who delights in communing with the earth in their own little corner of half-tamed nature, whilst blithely ignoring the pressures of family and day-to-day life, will find a kindred spirit in Elizabeth.”

Of course careful watchers of the wonderful “Downton Abbey” on PBS will recognize this title as the one Mr. Mosely presses on Anna as a pretext for talking with her. Of course any tie to Downton must be interesting and this book was a best seller in its day. Remember books could be bestsellers for decades in the pre-copyright era.

So let’s take a look inside:

Luckily I had sown two great patches of sweetpeas which made me very happy all the summer, and then there were some sunflowers and a few hollyhocks under the south windows, with Madonna lilies in between. But the lilies, after being transplanted, disappeared to my great dismay, for how was I to know it was the way of lilies? And the hollyhocks turned out to be rather ugly colours, so that my first summer was decorated and beautified solely by sweet-peas. At present we are only just beginning to breathe after the bustle of getting new beds and borders and paths made in time for this summer. The eleven beds round the sun-dial are filled with roses, but I see already that I have made mistakes with some. As I have not a living soul with whom to hold communion on this or indeed on any matter, my only way of learning is by making mistakes.

But it is not all gardens. One of her children insists on a Bible story:

I began about Adam and Eve, with an eye to future parsonic probings. The April baby’s eyes opened wider and wider, and her face grew redder and redder. I was surprised at the breathless interest she took in the story—the other two were tearing up tufts of grass and hardly listening. I had scarcely got to the angels with the flaming swords and announced that that was all, when she burst out, “Now I’ll tell about it. Once upon a time there was Adam and Eva, and they had plenty of clothes, and there was no snake, and lieber Gott wasn’t angry with them, and they could eat as many apples as they liked, and was happy for ever and ever—there now!”

I can see this would have been the sort of book read upstairs and downstairs.

Click here to get your copy of “Elizabeth and Her German Garden” by Elizabeth von Arnim >>>

Most Wanted: Week Ending January 15

1. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

2. Catching Fire (The Second Book of the Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

3. Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

4. The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins

5. War Horse by Michael Morpurgo

6. Heroes of Olympus: The Son of Neptune (The Heroes of Olympus) by Rick Riordan

7. KEEPING COUNSEL (legal thriller, thriller) by Rebecca Forster

8. Whispers from the Ashes by Patricia Hester

9. SILENT WITNESS (legal thriller, thriller) (The Witness Series,#2) by Rebecca Forster

10. Throwaway by Heather Huffman

11. Chasing Rainbows by Kathleen Long

12. 52 Small Changes: One Year to a Happier, Healthier You by Brett Blumenthal

13. Hollowmen (The Hollows #2) by Amanda Hocking

14. My Horizontal Life  by Chelsea Handler

15. Megan’s Hero (The Callahans of Texas) by Sharon Gillenwater

16. The Dead Man (Jack Davis Thrillers) by Joel Goldman

17. Double Dare by Rhonda Nelson

18. Wife by Wednesday by Catherine Bybee

19. Courageous by Randy Alcorn, Stephen Kendrick, Alex Kendrick

20. Why Me? by Sarah Burleton

21. CHARACTER WITNESS (legal thriller, mystery) by Rebecca Forster

22. The Letter by Trae Macklin

23. The Last Olympian (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Book 5) by Rick Riordan

24. Emily’s Chance: A Novel (The Callahans of Texas) by Sharon Gillenwater

25. Mile High Guy (Irish Romantic Comedy) by Marisa Mackle

Free Classics: Way of the Lawless by Max Brand

Every Friday, Marilyn Knapp Litt, who blogs at ClassicKindle.com, brings us her recommendation of a free classic book to discover (or rediscover) on Kindle. Find more of Marilyn’s recommendations at her blog, ClassicKindle.com, a guide to the best free and inexpensive classic literature for the Kindle. You can also get Marilyn’s blog on Kindle and I recommend that you “Like” the Classic Kindle Facebook page as well so you don’t miss anything. Here’s Marilyn’s post:

Western readers know Frederick Faust who wrote under the pen name Max Brand. What they may not know is Faust was a war correspondent killed in Italy by shrapnel during WWII.

Unlike other Western writers who place their cowboys before the “decline” of the West, Brands characters in Way of the Lawless (1921) confront the new world head on:

Pat Gregg was leaving the saloon; he was on his horse, but he sat the saddle slanting, and his head was turned to give the farewell word to several figures who bulged through the door of the saloon. For that reason, as well as because of the fumes in his brain, he did not hear the coming of the automobile. His friends from the saloon yelled a warning, but he evidently thought it some jest, as he waved his hand with a grin of appreciation. The big car was coming, rocking with its speed; it was too late now to stop that flying mass of metal.

But not everything has changed:

“Be on your way, Buck. Get out of town, and get out of trouble. My boy hears you been talkin’ about him, and he allows as how he’ll get you. He’s out for you now.”

The fumes cleared sufficiently from Buck Heath’s mind to allow him to remember that Jasper Lanning’s boy was no other than the milk-blooded Andy. He told Jasper to lead his boy on. There was a reception committee waiting for him there in the person of one Buck Heath.

“Don’t be a fool, Buck,” said Jasper, glancing over his shoulder. “Don’t you know that Andy’s a crazy, man-killin’ fool when he gets started? And he’s out for blood now. You just slide out of town and come back when his blood’s cooled down.”

Buck Heath took another drink from the bottle in his pocket, and then regarded Jasper moodily. “Partner,” he declared gloomily, putting his hand on the shoulder of Jasper, “maybe Andy’s a man-eater, but I’m a regular Andy-eater, and here’s the place where I go and get my feed. Lemme loose!”

Don’t you want to know what happens? Kick up your boots and sit a spell with Max Brand.

Click here to get your free copy of Way of the Lawless by Max Brand >>>